Rachel Bodine graduated from college with a BA in English. She has since worked as a Feature Writer in the insurance industry and gained a deep knowledge of state and countrywide insurance laws and rates. Her research and writing focus on helping readers understand their insurance coverage and how to find savings. Her expert advice on insurance has been featured on sites like PhotoEnforced, All...

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Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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Reviewed by Jeffrey Johnson
Insurance Lawyer

UPDATED: Nov 27, 2021

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Just the Basics

  • Car insurance companies look back three years to determine risk
  • Accidents and DUIs place you in a high-risk pool
  • DUIs can drive up your car insurance rates by 72%

Are you searching for car insurance companies that only look back three years? The best car insurance companies look back up to five years.

But did you know some moving violations can last more than five years on your driving record? Don’t worry — we’re to help.

Our car insurance guide explores which insurance companies look back three years and how to compare car insurance for high-risk drivers.

After learning everything about car insurance companies that only look back three years, enter your ZIP code above to compare multiple insurance companies near you.

What are the best car insurance companies that only look back three years?

Progressive and State Farm car insurance look back two to three years at driving records and insurance records.

Most car insurance companies look back three years. Here’s a list of the best car insurance companies that look back three years or less.

  • Allstate
  • American Family
  • Farmers
  • GEICO
  • Liberty Mutual
  • Nationwide
  • Travelers
  • USAA

What about car insurance companies that don’t look back three years? State statutes may limit car insurance companies that don’t look back three years.

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Why do car insurance companies look back three years?

Traffic infractions can last more than three years on your driving record. For example, some states keep speeding violations on your driving history for more than five years.

Let’s look at the laws of each state to see how long speeding infractions last on your driving record. Use the search box to find your state quickly.

Duration of Speeding Violations on Your Driving Record
StatesYears on Driving Record
Alabama2 years for points to be removed for suspension, but the incident is permanent on your record
Alaska1 year
Arizona1 year
Arkansas3 years
California3 years and 3 months (39 months)
ColoradoCan reduce points, but the incident is permanent on record
Connecticut3 years
Delaware2 years
District of Columbia2 years
Florida5 years
Georgia2 years
Hawaii10 years
Idaho3 years
IllinoisUp to 5 years
Indiana2 years
Iowa5 years
Kansas3 years
Kentucky5 years, but points removed after 2 years
Louisiana3 years
Maine1 year
Maryland3 years
Massachusetts6 years
Michigan7 years
Minnesota5 to 10 years
Mississippi1 year
Missouri3 years
MontanaPoints removed after 3 years, but conviction is permanent on record
Nebraska5 years
NevadaPoints removed after 1 year, but conviction is permanent on record
New Hampshire3 years
New Jersey5 years
New Mexico1 year
New York1.5 years
North Carolina3 years
North Dakota3 years
Ohio2 years toward suspension, but incident is permanent on record
OklahomaUp to 3 years
Oregon2 years
Pennsylvania1 year
Rhode Island3 years
South Carolina2 years
Tennessee2 years
Texas3 years
Utah3 years
Vermont2 years
Virginia5 years
Washington5 years
West Virginia5 years, but points removed after 2 years
Wisconsin5 years
Wyoming1 year

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In some states, car insurance companies look back more than three years. States like Maine, Mississippi, New Mexico, and Pennsylvania hold on to speeding violations for one year.

However, insurance companies want to check for serious driving violations, such as at-fault accidents and DUI convictions. Therefore, most companies may look back five years or more.

How long do car accidents and DUIs stay on your driving record?

Accidents can last up to three years on your driving record, but DUIs and DWIs can remain on your driving record for up to ten years.

Therefore, the best insurance companies look back further than three years if you have accidents and DUI convictions on your driving history.

Is my driving history different from my car insurance history?

The short answer is yes. But your insurance record is just as important as your driving history.

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange (CLUE) catalogs your insurance history in its database.

State governments hold your driving record.

You can request a CLUE report for free once per year. CLUE reports list your insurance company history, the claims you’ve made, and the number of accidents you’ve had.

How do car insurance companies use my driving history?

Your driving record correlates to risk. For example, a clean driving record shows that you’re less likely to file an insurance claim.

Any traffic violations on your driving record correlate to higher chances of filing a car insurance claim.

Most driving infractions have an impact on car insurance rates. For example, DUIs drive up your insurance rates by 72%.

Let’s examine how DUIs affect car insurance for each state:

Comparing Monthly Car Insurance Rates for Clean Driving Records vs. DUI Convictions
StatesMonthly Car Insurance Rates with a Clean Driving RecordMonthly Car Insurance Rates with a DUI ConvictionPercent Increase
Alabama$156$27576%
Alaska$131$19448%
Arizona$256$37044%
Arkansas$172$28063%
California$151$429184%
Colorado$260$37645%
Connecticut$229$463102%
Delaware$240$36954%
Florida$269$34127%
Georgia$199$32362%
Hawaii$147$471221%
Idaho$142$23666%
Illinois$185$28253%
Indiana$124$21272%
Iowa$138$22261%
Kansas$170$24846%
Kentucky$242$40668%
Louisiana$296$43246%
Maine$107$18169%
Maryland$199$26734%
Massachusetts$180$30570%
Michigan$756$2,260199%
Minnesota$176$31278%
Mississippi$181$31474%
Missouri$211$30143%
Montana$191$29655%
National Average$198$35072%
Nebraska$187$24732%
Nevada$255$40860%
New Hampshire$168$30783%
New Jersey$234$37460%
New Mexico$170$26456%
New York$231$32842%
North Carolina$126$502300%
North Dakota$191$28751%
Ohio$130$20054%
Oklahoma$205$28338%
Oregon$194$30256%
Pennsylvania$150$20235%
Rhode Island$299$629110%
South Carolina$173$27257%
South Dakota$202$31154%
Tennessee$156$25261%
Texas$221$38072%
Utah$200$30653%
Vermont$145$22355%
Virginia$137$21154%
Washington$146$24165%
West Virginia$176$31680%
Wisconsin$130$20659%
Wyoming$177$28964%

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Each state handles DUI differently, but car insurance companies across the United States increase car insurance rates if you have a DUI on your driving record.

Expect your insurance rates to look similar when you have multiple speeding tickets, reckless driving violations, and accidents. Drivers with too many infractions are considered high-risk.

What makes a driver a high risk to car insurance companies?

Too many driving violations or accidents place you in a high-risk pool. Some states require you to get an SR-22 (SR-50 in Indiana) when you are listed as a high-risk driver.

Florida and Virginia both have FR-44 for high-risk drivers who have been convicted of a DUI.

Your high-risk driving status can last up to three years under SR-22. If you’re still considered a high-risk driver after that, you’ll have to reapply for SR-22 certification.

Drivers who don’t get SR-22 certified could lose their car insurance coverage, and the insurance company can report your uninsured status to the state DMV.

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Car Insurance Companies That Only Look Back Three Years: The Bottom Line

Progressive and State Farm are two of the best car insurance companies that only look back three years. But that could change depending on the state where you live.

Car insurance with a three-year accident history is more expensive than average, and it could take longer to receive more affordable rates.

Now that you know more about car insurance companies that only look back three years, use our free online quote tool to compare multiple insurance companies near you.

Frequently Asked Questions: Car Insurance Companies That Only Look Back Three Years

Do you want to know more about car insurance companies that only look back three years? Then, read these answers to learn more.

#1 – Do car insurance companies report to the DMV?

Yes, car insurance companies may alert your state DMV when you’re uninsured.

#2 – How long does high-risk car insurance last?

On average, high-risk car insurance lasts for three years. DUIs extend your high-risk status for at least ten years.

#3 – How far back do car insurance companies look at your driving record?

The average look-back period is three years. However, look-back periods vary by state and company.

#4 – Why do traffic violations affect car insurance rates?

Traffic infractions and moving violations correlate to a high risk of filing claims. Too many violations increase your car insurance rates.

#5 – How can I get a copy of my car insurance history?

Contact the Comprehensive Loss Underwriting Exchange (CLUE) and ask for a free CLUE report. You can receive one free insurance report per year.