When driving a State of Utah registered vehicle, insurance is required at all times.

Utah minimum car insurance requirements are:

  • Auto Insurance policy with limits of at least 25/65/15 – meaning:
    • Liability coverage
    • $25,000 of bodily injury to another person
    • $65,000 of bodily injuries to all other persons
    • $15,000 of injury to or destruction of property of others in any one accident

Uninsured and Underinsured motorist coverage, and personal injury protection (PIP) insurance are recommended to protect you from those who drive without any or enough insurance, and will be included in your coverage unless you reject them in writing.

Alternative Options to Insurance

Self insurance certificates, or certificates of self-funded coverage, are available in Utah if the following requirements are met:

  • You or your company must have more than 24 registered vehicles
  • You have, to the Department of Public Safety’s knowledge and satisfaction, $200,000 in securities plus $100 per vehicle insured up to 1,000 vehicles and $50 per each vehicle you insure after 1,001 vehicles

In Utah, you have the option to use a liability bond or cash deposit instead of insurance if the following requirements are met:

  • Cash deposit or equivalent securities of at least $160,000 with the state treasurer
  • Liability bond meeting the state’s minimum liability requirements

Required Proof of Insurance in Utah

Insurance certificate provided by Insurance company including all of the following:

  • Name of Insurance Company
  • Insurance Policy Number
  • Effective Date/Expiration Date of Policy
  • Accurate description of all vehicles covered in the policy
  • Name of Insured Driver

Certificates of self-funded coverage are issued by the state and must include the following:

  • Certificate Number issued by Department of Public Safety
  • Effective Date of Certificate
  • Accurate description of year, make/model of registered vehicle
  • Name of driver covered by certificate
  • Certificate of Deposit
  • Certificate number issued by State Treasurer
  • Name of driver covered by certificate of deposit
  • Liability Bond
  • Name of company issuing bond
  • Bond number
  • Name of driver covered by bond

Utah Insurance Department

3110 State Office Building
Salt Lake City, UT 84114
(801) 538-3800

Utah Department of Public Safety

4501 S. 2700 W
PO Box 141775
Salt Lake City, UT 84114-1775
(801) 965-4461

Obtaining a Learner’s Permit

All applicants, regardless of age, who have never held a drivers license in Utah or another state must obtain a learners permit before applying for a license. To obtain a permit, applicants must:

  • Be at least 15 years old
  • Pass a written knowledge test
  • Pass a medical and eye exam
  • Have a parent or guardian sign for financial responsibility
  • Pay a $15 fee

Obtaining a Learner’s Permit

All applicants, regardless of age, who have never held a drivers license in Utah or another state must obtain a learners permit before applying for a license. To obtain a permit, applicants must:

  • Be at least 15 years old
  • Pass a written knowledge test
  • Pass a medical and eye exam
  • Have a parent or guardian sign for financial responsibility
  • Pay a $15 fee

Restrictions to Learner’s Permits

Drivers 18 years old and younger face certain restrictions as permit holders. They may only drive if:

  • An approved driving instructor or licensed parent or legal guardian, who has signed financial responsibility forms for the driver, is in the front seat
  • The permit is in their immediate possession at all times

Obtaining a Driver’s License

Permit holders may apply for full Class D licenses when they have:

  • Turned 16 years old
  • Carried a permit for at least six months
  • Completed an approved driver education course
  • Passed the road skills driving test
  • Completed 40 hours of driving, 10 of which must be at night, as certified by a parent or legal guardian
  • A signed application by a parent or legal guardian willing to assume financial responsibility for the driver

Restrictions for drivers under 18 years old

Drivers younger than 17 may not drive between midnight at 5 a.m. unless accompanied by a licensed driver at least 21 years old, or unless driving from a place of employment or school function, or unless on assignment for a farmer or rancher and engaged in agricultural work, or unless in an emergency situation.

Drivers under 18 who have been licensed for less than six months may not drive on any Utah highway with any non-family passengers unless accompanied by a licensed driver at least 21 years old, or unless driving from a place of employment or school function, or unless on assignment for a farmer or rancher and engaged in agricultural work, or unless in an emergency situation.

Once you meet the requirements to apply for either a learner’s permit or a driver’s license, visit your local DMV and bring the following:

  • A completed application, available for download online.
  • Documents that verify your identity. A complete list of acceptable documents is available online.
  • Proof of driving experience, such as evidence of completion of a driver education course, if applying for a full license.
  • Cash, check, money order or credit card for your applicable fee: $15 for a learner’s permit, $30 for a first-time license for drivers under 21, and $25 for drivers 21 and older.

Here are the requirements to obtain your first license for residents over the age of 18:

  • Complete a driver license application, available for download.
  • Take a driver education course through a commercial driving school or online, and complete the required 12-hour hands-on training.
  • Provide required identification documents. A complete list of acceptable documents is available online.
  • Pass the written knowledge test.
  • Pass the road skills test.

Completing Driver Education

When a child reaches the age of 15, they may enroll in a driver education program. In Utah, ALL drivers applying for a driver’s license and permit, regardless of age, must complete a driver education program. This can help drivers improve their driving safety knowledge, which in turn can help them qualify for some of the best car insurance rates in Utah. The course:

  • May be taken through a local high school.
  • May be taken through a state-approved commercial driving school.
  • May be taken online through an approved online/home study program.
  • Requires 18 hours of classroom or online instruction, six hours of behind-the-wheel driving time and six hours of observation time. For online courses, the driving time may be completed at a high school or commercial driving school.

It is recommended that you research any driver training program that you enroll in to assure it will meet your needs and comply with state laws. A list of state-approved programs is available online.

Knowing the Rules of the Road

Utah provides its rules of the road online. Carefully obey these rules to avoid violations and to qualify for the lowest auto insurance rates in Utah.

Residents of Utah will typically fall into one category of driver to insurance providers. Standard drivers have the fewest violations and claims and have the best car insurance rates in Utah. Non-standard drivers have a few tickets and accidents on their records and will pay rates that are higher, but still affordable. High-risk drivers, who might have trouble finding insurance through the voluntary market, typically have a lengthy history of incidents or have a violation such as Driving Under the Influence on their record. These drivers will have policies with costs that are much higher than the average cost of car insurance in Utah.

Know Your Rates

Auto insurance rates are calculated by carefully considering all of the licensed drivers in the household and the risk the insurance company deems them to be to insure.

  • Age. Statistics indicate that drivers under the age of 25 are involved in more accidents than those aged between 25 and 65. For this reason, drivers under 25 years old are considered a higher risk, so households with younger drivers will pay more for insurance.
  • Gender. Statistical evidence suggests that men under the age of 25 are involved in more accidents than women in the same age group, so male drivers typically will pay higher insurance rates than female drivers.
  • Driving record and claims history. Drivers with a lengthy record of violations and accidents are considered more likely to be in another accident and are considered riskier drivers, so they will pay higher rates.
  • Geographical area. Drivers who live in areas that are prone to crimes such as car theft and burglary, such as those in urban areas, are likely to pay higher rates than those who live in more rural areas. Drivers who live in places with a high incidence of accidents will also pay higher rates.
  • Make, model, and year of the vehicle. In general, the more expensive and high-performance the vehicle, the more drivers will have to pay to insure them due to the fact that those vehicles are more likely to be stolen and often, more expensive to repair.
  • Credit history. According to the Utah Insurance Department, drivers with higher (better) credit scores are presumed to have fewer and less costly losses. Those with higher scores are deemed more responsible, so they may qualify for affordable auto insurance in Utah.

Lower Your Rates

Speak with an insurance agent and find out exactly what your insurance plan will cover for the price you are paying so that you feel confident you are getting the best plan for your needs and budget. The Utah Insurance Department offers tips to consumers to help them as they begin their search for the best auto insurance policy for them. First, make sure to compare auto insurance rates in Utah by shopping around before you buy. Talk to several different agents before deciding which policy best suits your needs.

Once you have selected an agent, before signing your policy agreement, call the UID to make sure the agent and company is licensed by the state. Consider revising what you’ll spend on monthly rates and incident-based deductibles. You may be able to lower your monthly premium by increasing what you’ll pay out of pocket when you file a claim. Also consider paying for smaller incidents out of pocket without filing a claim, as your rates may go up with each claim. Review and revise your policy regularly to make sure you aren’t paying for vehicles that you no longer own or drivers who are on another insurance plan.

Ask your agent about discounts you might be eligible for. Companies often offer discounts for insuring multiple vehicles or homes and vehicles, with the same company. You might also be eligible for discounts for taking driver education courses, insuring drivers with good academic records, and for driving vehicles with extra safety and anti-theft features. It is also possible for companies to offer lower rates for cars driven infrequently for drivers who are renewing coverage with a clean driving record.

Picking an Insurance Agent/Broker

Insurance agents who work with insurance companies aim to sell policies for commission. Insurance brokers, on the other hand, do not represent a company. Instead, they work with individual clients, assessing their needs and finding different insurance options through different companies. Like agents, they also receive a commission for the sales they make from different insurance companies. Both types of experts can help you find the best car insurance in Utah to suit your needs.

Whether you use an agent or broker, make sure that they are licensed with the UID. You can call the UID or conduct an online search for an agent, company or broker. In addition, you can request information from the UID about how many complaints have been filed against a particular agent or broker.

The UID’s website offers a great starting point for auto insurance consumers. Online, you can find a glossary of auto insurance terms, tips to prevent auto theft, and information about fake insurance.

If you have had issues with an insurance company, you can also file a complaint online You can also ask general insurance questions or get information about various policies. Contact the UID at (801) 538-3805 in the Salt Lake City area, or toll-free, statewide at 1(800) 439-3805.

After an Accident

Accidents are never fun, but by following laws set in place regarding accident protocol, every party involved can move on as quickly as possible.

Utah law requires the driver of any vehicle involved in an accident that results in injury, property damage or death to exchange vital information with each other driver involved, including: name, address, vehicle registration number, the name of the insurance provider, and policy number. Drivers must show their license and information to responding law enforcement officers and other drivers involved in the incident or those whose property might have been damaged, even if the other drivers have no car insurance in Utah.

You should call the police as quickly as possible and may request medical attention while on the phone with the dispatcher. Before medical personnel are present, render as much aid as possible, being careful not to move anyone who is laying on the ground, as you could do further damage. If you cause damage to a vehicle or to property when the owner is not present, the law requires you to securely attach written notice of what happened to the damaged property, including your name, address and vehicle registration number.

Once an accident has occurred, it is essential to call your insurance company right away, even if you were not at fault for what happened. They will need to know the essential information gathered from other drivers and potential witnesses, and will require a copy of any police report filed. Once they have all the information about the accident, they will investigate fault and will let you know your options for car repairs and what your next steps will be.

Insurance for High-Risk Drivers

The Utah Automobile Insurance Plan was created to provide insurance to drivers who are deemed too risky to coverage providers in the voluntary market. Drivers who have been denied coverage through the traditional market are shared among various companies who write high-risk plans in Utah.

Utah is part of the Western Association of Automobile Insurance Plans, or WAAIP, which is a center that will put high-risk drivers in touch with insurance companies that can provide them with coverage. For more information, go to Utah Plan Sites or call a local licensed insurance agent.

Additional Help

The Utah Insurance Department offers assistance to anyone shopping for insurance. They will answer questions related to insurance, investigate complaints with specific agencies, agents, or brokers, provide information to consumers on insurance law and procedures, and enforce insurance law on the consumer’s behalf if needed. You can contact them at (801) 538-3805 in the Salt Lake City area, or toll-free, statewide at 1(800) 439-3805.

Online resources include: